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Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) FAQ

What is a traumatic brain injury?

If you experience any forceful contact to your head, and it disrupts your brain’s natural functions, then you’ve experienced a traumatic brain injury, or TBI. Your brain can be injured by other conditions, like infections or strokes, but those kinds of injuries are called “acquired brain injuries,” or ABIs. They can be just as life altering as a TBI.

Doctors classify TBIs as either mild, moderate, or severe. Since most TBIs are mild, many people who sustain a TBI find that their symptoms get better over time. In fewer but more serious cases of TBI, the effects of the damage can last a lifetime.

How does a TBI affect the brain and body?

When a TBI occurs, anything having to do with your brain is potentially affected. That means your basic body functions, like eating and sleeping, can be altered. It also means that the complex parts of your life such as your emotions, your thoughts, and your ability to communicate can also be disrupted.

In serious cases, TBI can also affect the brain’s electrical system, causing seizures. Such a condition is commonly known as epilepsy. TBI is also known to increase the risk for other conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson disease.